Splitsider

"We had this sketch ‘Time Traveling Scott Joplin’ that I liked, with Maya [Rudolph] playing time traveling Scott Joplin. That was because our office was next to Jeff Richmond, Tina’s husband who did the music. He would have to wait around all night because people would come to him and get him to help them write songs. He was just in his office and he had a keyboard. He was playing ragtime nonstop right next to us. We were supposed to write this sketch that Slovin had pitched, a tennis idea that Lorne liked, and then we realized it was actually a terrible idea. So we had to write something about tennis. That assignment plus Jeff Richmond playing ragtime nonstop for hours turned into that sketch."
- former SNL writer Leo Allen on the origins of the “Tennis Talk with Time Traveling Scott Joplin” sketches

"We had this sketch ‘Time Traveling Scott Joplin’ that I liked, with Maya [Rudolph] playing time traveling Scott Joplin. That was because our office was next to Jeff Richmond, Tina’s husband who did the music. He would have to wait around all night because people would come to him and get him to help them write songs. He was just in his office and he had a keyboard. He was playing ragtime nonstop right next to us. We were supposed to write this sketch that Slovin had pitched, a tennis idea that Lorne liked, and then we realized it was actually a terrible idea. So we had to write something about tennis. That assignment plus Jeff Richmond playing ragtime nonstop for hours turned into that sketch."

- former SNL writer Leo Allen on the origins of the “Tennis Talk with Time Traveling Scott Joplin” sketches

"I’ve never thought that I was going to be discovered. I just didn’t think that — I just thought I’d be somebody who was a hard worker. And for me things started to happen once I completely gave up the concept of being discovered, and I in essence discovered what I wanted to do. That would be my advice to young performers: Don’t want to be famous. Want to be legendary, but in many ways, fame is the industrial disease of creativity — it’s a sludgy byproduct of making things."
- Mike Myers

"I’ve never thought that I was going to be discovered. I just didn’t think that — I just thought I’d be somebody who was a hard worker. And for me things started to happen once I completely gave up the concept of being discovered, and I in essence discovered what I wanted to do. That would be my advice to young performers: Don’t want to be famous. Want to be legendary, but in many ways, fame is the industrial disease of creativity — it’s a sludgy byproduct of making things."

- Mike Myers